The English episode of Memory Cultures in Dialogue podcast is out

The English episode of Memory Cultures in Dialogue podcast is out

KS-logoHow and why does wartime violence against civilians occur in the communities that have lived together in peace for a long time? Why does this happen in some local-level communities and not in others? How does memory of the past waves of violence matter in this context? In our first episode in English, we are discussing these questions on the examples of armed conflicts in Croatia, Uganda and Guatemala. Our guest is Mila Dragojević, Associate Professor in Politics at the University of South, Sewanee and the author of Amoral Communities: Collective Crimes in Time of War.

The episode is available on the podcast website: https://www.kulturesecanja.org/en/podcast/episode-3-amoral-communities/

The new blog post summarises our conversation with Mila Dragojević and the key points of her recent book:  https://www.kulturesecanja.org/en/blog/amoral-communities/ ‎

Follow Memory Cultures in Dialogue Facebook page for regular updates: https://www.facebook.com/kulturesecanja

Project Memory Cultures in Dialogue is supported by NIWANO Peace Foundation from Japan.

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Humanitarian Law Center is starting an audio podcast and blog Memory Cultures in Dialogue

Humanitarian Law Center is starting an audio podcast and blog Memory Cultures in Dialogue

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The first episode of “Memory Cultures in Dialogue”, an podcast of the Humanitarian Law Center, has been released.

What are memory cultures? What is the purpose of politics of memory? What do young people today learn and know about the recent history? In the introductory podcast episode, we are discussing memory cultures and politics. Our guests are historian Olga Manojlović Pintar from the Institute for Recent History of Serbia and sociologist Tamara Pavasović Trošt from the University of Ljubljana.

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War Crimes Trials – Still at The Beginning

War Crimes Trials – Still at The Beginning

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Within the regular activities of the “Monitoring Conflict Related Crime Trials in Kosovo and the Inclusion of the Youth in the Justice Sector” project, in the second half of February 2020, the Humanitarian Law Center in Kosovo (HLCK) finished drafting its planned yearly report on the most significant trials monitored during past year, titled “War Crimes Trials – Still at The Beginning”.

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Criminal charges for the murder of Himzo Fazlić in May 1992

Criminal charges for the murder of Himzo Fazlić in May 1992

zvornik-thumbOn April 22, 2020, the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) filed a criminal complaint with the Office of the War Crimes Prosecutor (OWCP) against several unidentified persons, for the murder of Himzo Fazlić in Zvornik in May 1992.

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Report on War Crimes Trials in Serbia during 2019

Report on War Crimes Trials in Serbia during 2019

Report_on_war_crimes_trials_2019-en-thumbOn the following link you could read the 8th Report on War Crimes Trias in Serbia during 2019 prepared by the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC).

The HLC has monitored all war crimes trials conducted in the territory of Serbia during 2019, namely a total of 24 cases conducted before the War Crimes Departments of the Higher Court and the Court of Appeal in Belgrade. The Report provides a brief overview of all the cases and of the HLC’s basic findings in respect of proceedings which are of public relevance. A large number of the war crimes cases covered by this Report have been going on for a number of years now, so that previous HLC Reports on war crimes trials may also be consulted for a full grasp of the course of the proceedings and the relevant HLC findings.

The Report focuses on the work of the Office of the War Crimes Prosecutor (OWCP) and the courts in sessions open to the public, primarily analysing the indictments and judgments in each particular case. An analysis of the work of other bodies involved in the prosecution of war crimes – the War Crimes Investigation Service of the Serbian Ministry of the Interior (MUP), the Witness Protection Unit and others, could not be undertaken in respect of the individual cases, as no information on their activities was publicly available.

In the reporting period, the War Crimes Department of the Higher Court in Belgrade handed down first-instance judgments in eight cases. The War Crimes Department of the Court of Appeal in Belgrade handed down four judgments and one ruling, two of the judgments and the ruling being on appeals lodged against judgments of the Higher Court in Belgrade, and the two other judgments on appeals against judgments of the Court of Appeal in Belgrade in proceedings in which the Department decided at third instance. Over the reporting period, the OWCP filed three indictments against three individuals.

Since it began working in 2003 until the end of 2019, the OWCP brought indictments in 76 war crimes cases, indicting a total of 198 persons and encompassing 2,454 victims who lost their lives. Three of the cases were joined with cases instituted earlier, and final rulings were rendered in 49 out of 73 cases; one case was terminated on account of the death of the defendant; in three cases the indictments were dismissed because the defendants had been found unfit to stand trial; and 20 cases are ongoing. In those cases which have been finally concluded, a total of 70 defendants have been convicted and 52 acquitted.

Preceding the analyses of the cases in the Report is an overview of general findings on war crimes trials in 2019, and of important socio-political developments which have had some bearing on war crimes trials.

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Students of Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights visited HLC

Students of Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights visited HLC

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Students attending the Master’s Programme at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights visited the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) on February 12th, 2020, as part of their study visit to Serbia.


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The HLC presents its Report on the Implementation of the National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes and Policy Paper: Prosecution of Crimes of Sexual Violence during Armed Conflicts before the Courts of the Republic of Serbia

The HLC presents its Report on the Implementation of the National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes and Policy Paper: Prosecution of Crimes of Sexual Violence during Armed Conflicts before the Courts of the Republic of Serbia

predstavljanje_petog_izvestajaOn Monday, 23 December 2019, the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) presented its fifth Report on the Implementation of the National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes (Report). Opening a discussion on the Report, Ivana Žanić, Executive Director of the HLC, said that the National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes (the National Strategy) had been adopted with the aim of improving war crimes prosecution in Serbia, but also of shifting society’s attitude towards dealing with the past i.e. with the crimes committed during the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. Given that the National Strategy expires in 2020, continued Žanić, it cannot be said that it has accomplished its overall aim to date, since war crimes trials prosecution has not improved, nor has public perception regarding these themes changed.


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