Exhibition ArchiWar: Stories and Memories of the Srebrenica Genocide by Jelena Jaćimović

Exhibition ArchiWar: Stories and Memories of the Srebrenica Genocide by Jelena Jaćimović

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Exhibition ArchiWar: Stories and Memories of the Srebrenica Genocide by Jelena Jaćimović, organised in cooperation with the Humanitarian Law Center, will open in the Center for Cultural Decontamination on 28 September at 7PM.

The exhibition by Jelena Jaćimović represents a way of resisting the dominant memory politics in Serbia based on nationalism and militarism that encompasses the denial of war crimes and genocide committed by Serb forces, glorification of sentenced war criminals and army, and instrumentalisation of Serb victims.


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Policy Paper: The 1990s Wars in Former Yugoslavia in History Education

Policy Paper: The 1990s Wars in Former Yugoslavia in History Education

predlog-prakticne-primene-enThe state authorities in Serbia have formally committed to raising awareness about the 1990s wars in former Yugoslavia, the war crimes committed during them, and the necessity for their prosecution. The National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes, which the Government of the Republic of Serbia adopted in 2016, sets raising awareness and outreach in society as one of its goals. Within the outreach section, the National Strategy addresses formal education, but very briefly, and without binding regulations for educational authorities. The ongoing problem is that, in practice, formal education does not dedicate a lot of attention to the wars that followed the disintegration of Yugoslavia. Although education is mentioned, the National Strategy has not initiated any changes in the way the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s are taught.

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ANNOUNCEMENT: Online Discussion: “The 1990s Wars in History Education”

ANNOUNCEMENT: Online Discussion: “The 1990s Wars in History Education”

Ratovi-1990-ih-u-nastavi-istorije-thumbMore than two decades have passed since the end of the armed conflicts on the territory of the former Yugoslavia which took more than 130,000 lives. In today’s Serbia, the official memory politics on this period is characterised by historical revisionism, which sees the wars of the 1990s through a binary ethnocentric narrative about Serbian heroes and victims. Convicted war criminals enjoy public and institutional support, and many are even politically active. At the same time, in the memory politics and public discourses, the facts established before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and in numerous research projects are ignored or denied.


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