Report „The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits: the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020“

Report „The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits: the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020“

Izvestaj-reparacije-en

In March 12th, 2021 the Humanitarian Law Center presented the report „The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits: the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020“.

This report covers the analysis of cases which were active in the period between 2017 and 2020. Since the duration of most of these cases is longer than three years, for the ease of following the course of the proceedings, this report gives a brief overview of the course of the proceedings even before 2017.

The report is divided into three parts. First part analyzes the legal framework that regulates the victims’ right to reparation in Serbia. Second part analyzes individual cases where the HLC represented the victims, while third part deals with the main problems that the HLC has identified in its work as key obstacles hindering the victims from vindicating their reparation claims.

The report is available on this link

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EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: The presentation of the report “The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits – the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020”

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: The presentation of the report “The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits – the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020”

Izvestaj-reparacije-enOn Friday, March 12, 2021, at 11 AM, via the Zoom platform, the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) will present the report “The right to reparation in compensation lawsuits – the practice of Serbian courts 2017-2020”.
This report analyses the course of the litigation proceedings that were active in the period between 2017 and 2020. However, since most of these proceedings have lasted for more than three years, for the ease of following the course of the cases, this report gives a brief overview of the proceedings even before 2017.

This report is divided into three parts. The first part analyses the legal framework that regulates the victims’ right to reparation in Serbia. The second part analyses individual cases in which the HLC represented the victims, while the third part refers to the main problems identified by the HLC as the key obstacles hindering the victims from vindicating their reparation claims before domestic courts.

Speakers:

  • Meris Mušanović, Humanitarian Law Center
  • Mihailo Pavlović, Attorney-at-law
  • Ivana Žanić, Humanitarian Law Center

You can follow the presentation of the report via the following link: bit.ly/reparacije1203

Simultaneous translation into English language is provided

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EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Round table: Public opinion without the public in the courtroom

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Round table: Public opinion without the public in the courtroom

Okrugli sto slika ENGThe Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) and the daily newspaper “Danas” invite you to a round table “Public opinion without the public in the courtroom” where a policy paper “Public Relations of Institutions Responsible for War Crimes Cases in the Republic of Serbia: Analysis of Key Issues and Improvement Recommendations” and the Public opinion poll on “The Awareness of Serbian Citizens about the Wars and War Crimes of the ‘90s, and War Crimes Trials” will be presented. On this occasion, the findings on the implementation of the National Strategy for the Prosecution of War Crimes during 2020 will also be presented.


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EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: The XIII Forum for Transitional Justice in post-Yugoslav Countries

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: The XIII Forum for Transitional Justice in post-Yugoslav Countries

recom-reconciliation_networkOn December 21 and 22, the RECOM Reconciliation Network and Humanitarian Law Center are organising the XIII Forum for Transitional Justice in post-Yugoslav Countries.

The Forum for Transitional Justice is a platform for discussing contemporary topics related to different aspects of transitional justice in the post-Yugoslav space. This year, it is being held as an online event on the KUDO platform.

In three panels, the Forum participants will be discussing transitional justice in the region, as well as memorialisation, commemorations and the issue of missing persons in post-Yugoslav countries.

On the first day, December 21, two panels will be held.


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Online screening of the documentary “Depth Two”

Online screening of the documentary “Depth Two”

Dubina dvaFrom Monday, December 7, to Friday, December 11, 2020, you can watch online the documentary “Depth Two” about a mass grave discovered in Batajnica in 2001, where the bodies of hundreds of Kosovo Albanians – civilians killed during the war in Kosovo – were found.

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DOSSIER: Camps for Croats in Serbia

DOSSIER: Camps for Croats in Serbia

Dosije-logori-thumb-enOn November 18, 1991, after a three-month siege of the city, the Yugoslav Peoples’ Army (JNA) took over Vukovar with the assistance of the Serbian Territorial Defence Forces (TO) and military volunteer units. Upon occupying the city, a large number of members of the Croatian forces, as well as civilians, were captured by the JNA, including the wounded, women, minors and elderly people.

The JNA transferred those captured persons to the territory of Vojvodina, where already in September 1991 several camps for prisoners of war from the territory of Croatia had been established.

According to research conducted by the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC), the largest camp set up in Serbia was at the Sremska Mitrovica Penal Correctional Facility (KPD). In addition to this camp, there were camps in the Banat villages of Begejci and Stajićevo, the JNA barracks in Aleksinac and the Niš Penal Correctional Facility. In Serbia, there were also smaller “transit” camps and centres, where detainees stayed for several days before being transferred to some of the larger camps. Although there were more such camps, in this Dossier we have identified the facilities in Šid, a military police training centre in Bubanj Potok and a JNA barracks in Paragovo.

All the camps – except Niš, which was in the area of responsibility of the 3rd Military District (VO) of the JNA -, were within the area of responsibility of the 1st VO of the JNA. The security of the camp was provided by members of the JNA military police. JNA officers were appointed commanders of the camp; however, the real control of the camps was exercised by the Security Administration of the Federal Secretariat for National Defence (UB SSNO).


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