Natasa Kandic Recognised by the President of Croatia

Natasa Kandic, HLC Executive Director, received the Medal of Danica of Croatia on November 7, 2006. This recognition was awarded to Ms Kandic by the President of the Republic of Croatia Stjepan Mesic. She was recognised as an individual who, through her work and commitment, contributed to advancement of moral values.

Ms Kandic received the medal at the Croatian residence in Belgrade from H.E. Mr Tonci Stanicic, Ambassador of the Republic of Croatia to Serbia, who noted that Natasa Kandic “is the first person to establish contact with the victims following armed conflicts and their horrors.” “She demonstrated to Croats as well as everyone else in the region that crimes have no nationality and that one can speak about the crimes committed by others only once they clean up their own back yard,” added Ambassador Stanicic.

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Prijedor 1992: Van osnovane sumnje

Sorry, this entry is only available in srpski.

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Natasa Kandic to Speak at the Inaugural Session of the UN Human Rights Council

Ms Natasa Kandic, Humanitarian Law Center’s Executive Director, has been invited to speak at the inaugural session of the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) on June 22 in Geneva, Switzerland. Ms Kandic has been selected by representatives of 60 non-governmental organisations based in Geneva, in co-operation with a number of regional non-governmental organisations, who also endorsed the invitation. Ms Kandic will be one of only five NGO speakers worldwide to address the historical first session of the United Nations Human Rights Council.


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Ethnic Communities in Kosovo 2003 and 2004

During the course of 2003, Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) investigators visited all the settlements in Kosovo inhabited by persons belonging to ethnic minorities and interviewed 497 Serbs, Montenegrins, Roma, Bosniaks, Turks, Gorani, Egyptians, Ashkali, and Albanians. They paid special attention to the returnees. The investigators discussed with the interviewees the matters of security, freedom of movement, access to administrative and judicial authorities, access to health and social welfare services, employment, education, access to property, participation in political life, and return. The data they gathered indicate some improvement in 2003 regarding the freedom of movement and the return of refugees. This is a major step forward compared with the preceding period when Serbs in particular ran the risk of losing their lives outside their settlements.

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