Posts Written By: hlcadmin

Panel Discussion on Access to Information of Public Importance in Cases of War Crimes

Panel Discussion on Access to Information of Public Importance in Cases of War Crimes

Panel_diskusijaA meeting regarding the topic of access to information of public importance in cases of war crimes was held on April 4th, 2016, in the Library of the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC). The participants in the meeting were representatives of the Office of the Commissioner for Access to Information of Public Importance and Personal Data Protection, the Office of the War Crimes Prosecutor, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), Balkan Investigative Network in Serbia, the Belgrade Centre for Human Rights, the Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights, Partners for Democratic Change Serbia, as well as other experts.

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Students of the Geneva International Academy of Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Visit HLC

Students of the Geneva International Academy of Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Visit HLC

studentiSaturday, April 9th, 2016 – Thirty students attending a Master Programme at the Geneva International Academy of Humanitarian Law and Human Rights visited the Humanitarian Law Center as part of their study trip to Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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“Depth Two” Film Screenings in Niš, Čačak and Priština/Prishtine

“Depth Two” Film Screenings in Niš, Čačak and Priština/Prishtine

Dubina dvaDuring April 2016, the “Depth Two” Documentary by Ognjen Glavonić will be screened in Niš, Čačak and Priština/Prishtine.

The screening in Niš will be organized in the Niš Cultural Centre on April 14th at 19:00. After the screening, a discussion will be held with the director of the film Ognjen Glavonić, the film crew, and the director and screenwriter, Stevan Filipović, and the moderator of the discussion will be the editor of the Film and Video Programme of the Niš Cultural Centre, Dejan Dabić.

The screening in Čačak will be organized at the Nadedžda Petrović Art Gallery on April 18th at 20:00, and it will be followed by a discussion with the visitors.

The film will be premièred in Kosovo on April 16th at the Oda Theatre in Priština/Prishtine ar 20:00. A discussion with the film director Ognjen Glavonić, film producer and Humanitarian Law Center’s executive director Sandra Orlović, theater director Bekim Lumi and director of the Artpolis Zana Hoxha Krasniqi, will follow. The moderator of the discussion will be the Dokufest artistic director Veton Nurkollari.

“Depth Two” is a documentary which tries to present the events in which a great number of people, Albanian civilians, were killed 17 years ago, and whose bodies were then concealed for a long time from the public and from victims’ families, with a combination of testimonies and footages made at the scene of the crimes.

“Depth Two” was produced by Non-Aligned Films and the Humanitarian Law Center. It was premiered at the 66th Berlin Film Festival held in February 2016.

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The first judgment on the responsibility of the state for the crimes in Kosovo: Compensation to families of victims of the crime in Podujevo

The first judgment on the responsibility of the state for the crimes in Kosovo: Compensation to families of victims of the crime in Podujevo

I_presuda_o_odgovornosti_drzaveThe First Basic Court in Belgrade delivered the judgment obliging the Republic of Serbia to pay compensation in the total amount of 25.9 million dinars to 24 closest relatives of fourteen women and children who were killed in front of their own houses in Podujevo in March 1999 by members of the Ministry of Interior unit “Scorpions”. The Humanitarian Law Center (HLC), which represents the families of victims, considers the court made the right decision after a nine-year proceeding adding that in the second instance proceeding, due to the nature of the case, the court must compare the amount of compensation to standards of the European Court of Human Rights in similar cases.

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Closing the Karadžić File

Closing the Karadžić File

project-syndicateNEW YORK – The conviction by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) of Radovan Karadžić, the former Bosnian Serb leader, for crimes against humanity and genocide filled many, including me, with a sense of deep satisfaction. The verdict has not only brought some semblance of closure to the most brutal European conflict since World War II; it has also demonstrated the international community’s commitment to ensuring justice and accountability in such matters. Not even the not-guilty verdict of the Serbian nationalist leader Vojislav Šešelj, reached just a few days after Karadžić’s, can undermine that impact.

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Why Do Serbian Institutions Hide Information On War Crimes?

Why Do Serbian Institutions Hide Information On War Crimes?

Predstavljanje_izvestaja-5.04.2016On April 5th, 2016, the Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) presented its report “Access to documents related to crimes against international law in the possession of Serbian institutions: State Secret Prevails over Right to Truth”. The Report offers an overview of the practice in the Republic of Serbia Ministry of the Interior (MUP) and the Ministry of Defence (MO) in the enforcement of the rule on access to information of public importance in relation to investigation into the crimes against international law committed during the wars in the former Yugoslavia.

 

 

 


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The Mechanism Launches First Online Exhibition of Archives

The Mechanism Launches First Online Exhibition of Archives

Flag_of_the_United_NationsThe Mechanism today launched its first online exhibition entitled “A Glimpse into the Archives”.

The purpose of this exhibition is to allow the general public to contextualize, access, and understand the value of the archives of the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda (ICTR) and for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which are now in the custody of the Mechanism.

The exhibition features a selection of interesting items to illustrate the diversity of the records in the archives. The items include photographs of artefacts used as evidence in court, drawings made by witnesses, and an extract from a historic trial judgement.


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Access to documents related to crimes against international law in the possesion of Serbian institutions: State Secret Prevails over Right to the Truth

Access to documents related to crimes against international law in the possesion of Serbian institutions: State Secret Prevails over Right to the Truth

Drzavna tajnaOpen access to archives which contain documents that can assist in determining the facts about past human rights violations is a key prerequisite for the establishment of transitional justice processes and mechanisms. In societies like the Serbian, which have experienced periods marked by systematic violence, access to information regarding human rights violations is an essential element of the right of victims and society as a whole to know the truth.

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